DOG BREEDS THAT CANNOT SURVIVE IN INDIA

DOG BREEDS THAT CANNOT SURVIVE IN INDIA

Humans and dogs have co-existed since the beginning of civilization. We have become more inclined towards foreign dogs thus putting the native ones under neglect. Sadly, these awe-inspiring breeds are dying due to lack of proper care. There are so many names on this list that most people might not have even heard of.

5 International breeds that are not meant for India :

  1. Saint Bernard

Originally the Saint Bernard dog breed was used to guard the grounds of Switzerland’s Hospice Saint Bernard as well as to help find and save, lost and injured travelers. 

They have a very low tolerance to manage heat and can even get a heatstroke in an excessively hot day. Thus, if you are planning to own a saint Bernard dog in India, you have to take care of the climatic conditions. Also, the breeding of such dogs are not easy so proper care and training is a necessary step to take. He is versatile and excels in the show ring and in obedience trials, drafting (pulling a cart or wagon), and weight pulling competitions.

  2. Malamute

The Alaskan Malamute, one of the oldest Arctic sled dogs, is a powerful and substantially built dog with a deep chest and strong, well-muscled body. These breeds have a thick coat, which is meant to keep them warm in their native countries and is the reason they are unable to cope with high temperatures here. 

The Malamute stands well over the pads, and this stance gives the appearance of much activity and a proud carriage, with head erect and eyes alert showing interest and curiosity.

  3. Afghan Hound

The Afghan Hound is elegance personified. This unique, ancient dog breed has an appearance quite unlike any other: dramatic silky coat, exotic face, and thin, fashion-model build.

Looks aside, Afghan enthusiasts describe this hound as both aloof and comical. They Require a lot a grooming and can even require professional help. They are Not suitable with small pets and children and thus difficult to keep in an Indian family.

Hailing from Afghanistan, where the original name for the breed was Tazi, the Afghan is thought to date back to the pre-Christian era and is considered one of the oldest breeds.

4.Tibetan Terrier

The Tibetan Terrier is a medium-sized dog, profusely coated, of powerful build, and square in proportion. A fall of hair covers the eyes and foreface. 

Yes, they are cute and cuddly, but there’s a reason these breeds are not native to India. Many international breeds have a thick coat, which is meant to keep them warm in their native countries and is the reason they are unable to cope with high temperatures here. “It’s in the name.

The well-feathered tail curls up and falls forward over the back. The feet are large, flat, and round in shape producing a snowshoe effect that provides traction.

  5. Lhasa Apso

Lhasa Apso's thrive on high-quality food. An issue with this international breed is that we are unable to provide them with the kind of nutrition that they require, which is not available in India.

Since they usually have thick skin to support their heavy hair coat, Lhasa need a diet with good protein and fat levels. Breeders recommend a food with fat level above 14 percent. The protein source (meat, fish, game, etc.) depends on the individual dog’s tolerance and taste. Most Lhasa tend to utilize their food very well, and even slight overfeeding can lead to unpleasant digestive outcomes.