Dog training has rapidly evolved over the past few decades and it can be confusing for a new dog owner to figure out how to hire a dog trainer. 

The following section is designed to discuss the various methodologies found in dog training today and provide you with information on how to make an informed decision. 


Look for a trainer who offers what you want  : That may seem obvious. You want someone to help you train your dog – right? But different trainers have different skills and offer a variety of services. To really narrow down your specific needs and wants, ask yourself:

  • Do I want a group class or individual training?

  • Am I looking for general training or do I need help with a specific problem?

  • Am I primarily looking for short-term training opportunities to help my dog become a happy member of my family, or do I have specific long-term goals such as obedience or agility competition?

Investigate different training methods

Trainers use a variety of techniques and methods. Most of the techniques do “work” to change behavior, but not all are gentle, kind, and humane. When choosing a trainer, it is essential to understand which training methods are both humane and effective. Positive reinforcement training, for example, works by rewarding what the dog does right. It is an effective, humane, and fun way to train. Dogs can easily (and happily) learn everything from basic manners to masters’ level agility using positive reinforcement techniques.

Get a feel for the trainer’s people skills, too

A trainer is part teacher, part therapist, and part communications expert, and the right trainer will help you even more than she will help your dog. But let’s face it, most people who become dog trainers do so because they like or even love dogs, not because they are experts at working with people. 

 Check out the trainer’s level of experience

The length of time a trainer has offered professional services doesn’t determine her ability, but it is a gauge that should contribute to your decision. Someone who has less professional training experience but good skills, for example, may be great for a basic training class. In fact, newer trainers often bring to a class enthusiasm, energy, and creativity that a trainer who has taught for a long time may have lost.

 Cost and convenience count

While it can be said that you get what you pay for, it is equally true that for most of us a training class needs to be both affordable and convenient. A single class can get you started, but many people need or want advanced training opportunities. And the simple fact is, if you can’t afford the classes, you’re not likely to stick with it!

Keep your pet fit and fine with products from BonBeno, that your trainer might need. Visit www.BonBeno.com for more.

Dog training has rapidly evolved over the past few decades and it can be confusing for a new dog owner to figure out how to hire a dog trainer. 

The following section is designed to discuss the various methodologies found in dog training today and provide you with information on how to make an informed decision. 


Look for a trainer who offers what you want  : That may seem obvious. You want someone to help you train your dog – right? But different trainers have different skills and offer a variety of services. To really narrow down your specific needs and wants, ask yourself:

  • Do I want a group class or individual training?

  • Am I looking for general training or do I need help with a specific problem?

  • Am I primarily looking for short-term training opportunities to help my dog become a happy member of my family, or do I have specific long-term goals such as obedience or agility competition?

Investigate different training methods

Trainers use a variety of techniques and methods. Most of the techniques do “work” to change behavior, but not all are gentle, kind, and humane. When choosing a trainer, it is essential to understand which training methods are both humane and effective. Positive reinforcement training, for example, works by rewarding what the dog does right. It is an effective, humane, and fun way to train. Dogs can easily (and happily) learn everything from basic manners to masters’ level agility using positive reinforcement techniques.

Get a feel for the trainer’s people skills, too

A trainer is part teacher, part therapist, and part communications expert, and the right trainer will help you even more than she will help your dog. But let’s face it, most people who become dog trainers do so because they like or even love dogs, not because they are experts at working with people. 

 Check out the trainer’s level of experience

The length of time a trainer has offered professional services doesn’t determine her ability, but it is a gauge that should contribute to your decision. Someone who has less professional training experience but good skills, for example, may be great for a basic training class. In fact, newer trainers often bring to a class enthusiasm, energy, and creativity that a trainer who has taught for a long time may have lost.

 Cost and convenience count

While it can be said that you get what you pay for, it is equally true that for most of us a training class needs to be both affordable and convenient. A single class can get you started, but many people need or want advanced training opportunities. And the simple fact is, if you can’t afford the classes, you’re not likely to stick with it!

Keep your pet fit and fine with products from BonBeno, that your trainer might need. Visit www.BonBeno.com for more.